ready in about an hour
You might need to buy:
  • green onion
  • cucumber
  • dry farro/other grain
  • tomato
  • greek garlic dressing
  • 15oz can chickpeas
  • olive oil $0.12
  • smoked paprika
  • garlic powder
  • cumin
  • Salt to taste
ready in about an hour
You might need to buy:
  • •1 tsp salt
  • •1 tsp oregano
  • •1 tsp basil
  • •1/2 tsp pepper
  • •1/2 tsp smoked paprika
  • •1 tbs extra virgin olive oil

I used small elbows instead. Serve with homemade garlic bread, or toasted pitas.

serves 6
You might need to buy:
  • olive oil
  • chopped white onion
  • elbow pasta
  • chicken broth
  • petite diced tomatoes with their juice
  • chopped parsley or dill or combination
  • Salt & Lemon Pepper
You might need to buy:
  • salt
  • garlic cloves
  • cider vinegar
  • olive oil or vegetable oil
  • sour cream
You might need to buy:
  • garlic cloves
  • ground mustard
  • ground ginger or 2 tsp minced fresh ginger root
  • pepper
  • cayenne pepper
  • soy sauce
  • water

Serves 4

You will need 4 sturdy, uncolored toothpicks for this recipe. We prefer the taste and texture of homemade bread crumbs (simply tear 1 slice of white sandwich bread into pieces, grind in a food processor, and toast in a dry skillet until golden), but store-bought bread crumbs are acceptable here.

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS:
For the stuffing in our Greek-Style Grilled Stuffed Chicken Breasts, herb purees made with garlic and olive oil packed the most flavor and came together quickly, but oozed out of the chicken when cooked. We found that binding the herb puree with creamy and strong-flavored cheeses like fontina, pepper Jack, and feta worked better, especially when combined with just a few tablespoons of bread crumbs (or crushed corn chips).

To stuff, we sliced a pocket into the thickest part of the breast, spooned the filling into the pocket, and sealed the breast back up with a toothpick. Because of the added bulk from the stuffing, these chicken breasts needed extra time on the grill, so gently grilling the chicken with indirect heat worked better. A soak in oil, lemon juice, and garlic gave the chicken added protection against drying out on the grill, plus an extra boost of flavor to complement the stuffing.

You might need to buy:
  • extra-virgin olive oil
  • grated lemon zest from 1 lemon
  • fresh lemon juice from 1 lemon
  • sugar
  • salt
  • pepper
  • chopped fresh parsley leaves
  • chopped fresh oregano
  • crumbled feta cheese

Serves 4

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS:
To cut down on the cooking time for our Roast Chicken Pita Panini with Cucumber-Olive Salad, we used a whole, cooked rotisserie chicken instead of cooking the chicken ourselves. Weighing down the sandwiches with a Dutch oven created a makeshift panini press. For easy cleanup, we covered the bottom of the Dutch oven with aluminum foil.

You might need to buy:
  • olive brine
  • dried oregano
  • Dijon mustard
  • extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • crumbled feta cheese

Serves 6 to 8 as a main dish or 10 to 12 as an appetizer
Full-fat sour cream can be substituted for whole-milk Greek yogurt. Phyllo dough is also available in large 14 by 18-inch sheets; if using, cut them in half to make 14 by 9-inch sheets. Don’t thaw the phyllo in the microwave—let it sit in the refrigerator overnight or on the countertop for four to five hours. To make ahead, freeze the spanakopita on the baking sheet, wrapped well in plastic wrap, or cut the spanakopita in half crosswise and freeze smaller sections on a plate. Bake the spanakopita frozen, increasing the baking time by 5 to 10 minutes.

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS:
The roots of this savory spinach and feta pie, with its trademark layers of flaky, crisp phyllo, run deep in Greek culture, yet most stateside versions are nothing more than soggy layers of phyllo with a sparse, bland filling. We wanted a casserole-style pie with a perfect balance of zesty spinach filling and shatteringly crisp phyllo crust—and we didn’t want to spend all day in the kitchen. Using store-bought phyllo was an easy timesaver. Among the various spinach options (baby, frozen, mature curly-leaf), tasters favored the bold flavor of fresh curly-leaf spinach that had been microwaved, coarsely chopped, then squeezed of excess moisture. Crumbling the feta into fine pieces ensured a salty tang in every bite, while the addition of Greek yogurt buffered the assertiveness of the feta. We found that Pecorino Romano (a good stand-in for a traditional Greek hard sheep’s-milk cheese) added complexity to the filling and, when sprinkled between the sheets of phyllo, helped the flaky layers hold together. Using a baking sheet rather than a baking dish allowed excess moisture to easily evaporate, ensuring a crisp crust.

You might need to buy:
  • FILLING
  • water
  • minced fresh mint leaves
  • minced fresh dill leaves
  • grated zest plus 1 tablespoon juice from 1 lemon
  • ground nutmeg
  • ground black pepper
  • table salt
  • cayenne pepper
  • PHYLLO LAYERS
Belongs to jessicalynn416 Falafel 
You might need to buy:
  • chickpeas or garbanzo beans.
  • large onion
  • coriander
  • cumin
  • flour
  • Oil for frying
Belongs to denaseki Beef Kebabs 

Serves 4 to 6
To ensure evenly sized chunks, we prefer to purchase whole steak tips (sometimes labeled “flap meat”) and cut them ourselves. However, if you have long, thin pieces of meat, roll or fold them into approximate 2-inch cubes before skewering. (For more information, see related How-to-Cook.) Two and one-half pounds of blade steak can be substituted for the flap meat; if using, cut the steak in half and remove the gristle that runs through it. You will need four 12-inch metal skewers for this recipe. Our preferred brand of beef broth is Rachael Ray Stock-in-a-Box All-Natural Beef Flavored Stock.

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS:
Most beef kebabs are dis­appointing, with overcooked meat and vegetables that are either raw or mushy. We wanted to develop a foolproof approach to creating meaty kebabs that looked and tasted like the real thing: chunks of beef with a thick, caramelized char on the outside and a juicy, pink interior, all thoroughly seasoned by a marinade and paired with nicely browned, tender-firm vegetables. For the meat, we chose well-marbled steak tips, with their beefy flavor and tender texture. For the marinade, we included salt for moisture, oil for flavor, and sugar for browning. For even more depth, we used tomato paste, a host of seasonings and herbs, and beef broth. We chose three grill favorites for the vegetables: peppers, onions, and zucchini. Grilling the beef kebabs and vegetables on separate skewers over a two-level fire, which has hotter and cooler areas, allowed us to cook the vegetables over a lower temperature while the beef seared over the hotter area.

You might need to buy:
  • finely grated zest from 1 lemon
  • MARINADE
  • BEEF AND VEGETABLES
  • ground black pepper
  • sugar
  • table salt
  • tomato paste
  • beef broth
  • chopped fresh rosemary