You might need to buy:
  • unsalted butter plus more to butter baking sheet
  • all-purpose flour
  • cold milk
  • dijon mustard
  • sauce from chipotles in adobo sauce or chopped chipotles in adobo
  • kosher or coarse sea salt more to taste
  • taste freshly ground black pepper
  • sandwich bread
  • shredded Oaxaca cheese or 8 slices of muenster
  • thin slices of baked ham
  • eggs
  • Vegetable oil for cooking the eggs
  • ripe avocado for garnish
You might need to buy:
  • cilantro leaves and upper parts of stems chopped
  • brine from pickled jalapeños
  • freshly squeezed lime juice
  • olive oil
  • kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste
  • mayonnaise
  • prepared horseradish or more to taste
  • bacon
  • FUD Hot Links sausages
  • Oaxaca cheese shredded
  • hot dog buns
You might need to buy:
  • garlic cloves minced or pressed
  • ancho chili powder
  • dried oregano
  • kosher or coarse sea salt plus more for salting the water
  • taste freshly ground black pepper
  • boneless skinless chicken breasts cut into 1-inch cubes
  • dried spaghetti
  • butter
  • olive oil
  • flour
  • whole milk
  • heavy cream
  • cubed Oaxaca cheese
  • cubed asadero or muenster cheese
  • crumbled queso añejo or cotija for garnish

For a cake that boasted deep chocolate flavor and color, we used a combination of Dutch-processed cocoa and melted bittersweet chocolate; the cocoa offered pure, assertive chocolate flavor while the chocolate contributed complexity as well as fat and sugar. Neutral-tasting oil allowed the chocolate flavor to shine. To minimize cleanup, we mixed the wet and dry ingredients directly into the saucepan where we’d melted the chocolate with cocoa and milk. A milk chocolate ganache contrasted nicely with the deeper flavor of the cake. To make the ganache thick, rich, and creamy, we added plenty of softened butter to the warm chocolate-cream mixture, refrigerated the frosting to cool it quickly so that it would spread nicely, and gave it a quick whisk to smooth it out and lighten its texture.
While any high-quality chocolate can be used here, our preferred bittersweet chocolates are Ghirardelli 60% Cacao Bittersweet Chocolate Premium Baking Bar and Callebaut Intense Dark Chocolate, L-60-40NV, and our favorite milk chocolate is Dove Silky Smooth Milk Chocolate. We recommend making this cake with a Dutch-processed cocoa powder; our favorite is from Droste. Using a natural cocoa powder will result in a drier cake.

You might need to buy:
  • CAKE
  • baking soda
  • salt
  • whole milk
  • ⅔ cup vegetable oil
  • large eggs
  • vanilla extract
  • FROSTING
  • ⅔ cup heavy cream

Sour oranges pack a tart punch, and their juice makes a refreshing and bright dessert when it’s incorporated into a custard pie. Unfortunately, it’s not easy to find these oranges outside of Florida and a few other tropical locations. For a sour orange pie that would be accessible to cooks in any part of the country, we made a comparable substitute for the tart juice by combining lemon juice and orange juice concentrate. An animal cracker crust provided a sweet, crunchy contrast to the creamy, tangy citrus filling.
If sour oranges are available, use 3/4 cup of strained sour orange juice in place of the lemon juice and orange juice concentrate. Minute Maid Original Frozen is our favorite orange juice concentrate. Depending on the brand, 5 ounces is between 80 and 90 animal crackers.

You might need to buy:
  • CRUST:
  • animal crackers
  • sugar
  • salt
  • FILLING:
  • large egg yolks
  • grated orange zest
  • salt
  • WHIPPED CREAM:
  • sugar
  • grated orange zest

Nicely charred grilled broccoli is a summertime barbecue treat, but most often it is overly charred or not cooked through. To avoid toughness and promote even cooking, we peeled the stems and pared the broccoli crowns down to florets measuring 3 to 4 inches wide and stems ½ to ¾ inch thick. To cook the broccoli through without charring, we wrapped it in aluminum foil “hobo packs” and let it steam first on the grill (flipping the packs halfway through to ensure even cooking). We then removed the spears and placed them directly on the grill to char. Grilled lemon halves added brightness and grill flavor while shredded Parmesan provided a salty bite.

You might need to buy:
  • water
  • Salt and pepper
  • broccoli
  • shredded Parmesan cheese

A cookie in a skillet? We admit this Internet phenom made us skeptical. . . until we tried it. Unlike making a traditional batch of cookies, this treatment doesn’t require scooping, baking, and cooling multiple sheets of treats; the whole thing bakes at once in a single skillet. Plus, the hot bottom and tall sides of a well-seasoned cast-iron pan create a great crust on the cookie. And this treat can go straight from the oven to the table for a fun, hands-on dessert—or you can slice it and serve it like a tart for a more elegant presentation. What’s not to like? We cut back on butter and chocolate chips from our usual cookie dough recipe to ensure that the skillet cookie remained crisp on the edges and baked through in the middle while staying perfectly chewy. We also increased the baking time to accommodate the giant size, but otherwise this recipe was simpler and faster than baking regular cookies.

You might need to buy:
  • unsalted butter
  • vanilla extract
  • salt
  • large egg plus 1 large yolk
  • baking soda

To achieve the perfect smashed texture for this Southern potato salad, we cooked soft-skinned Yukon Gold potato chunks until just tender; then we coarsely mashed a portion of the potatoes before combining them with the remaining pieces. Adding a splash of vinegar to the potatoes while they were still hot added deep flavor. The mayonnaise-based dressing got its tangy punch from yellow mustard and cayenne pepper. To round out the salad, we added chopped hard-cooked eggs, celery, and onion. Chopped sweet pickles added unexpected sweetness and crunch.

You might need to buy:
  • Salt and pepper
  • distilled white vinegar
  • mayonnaise
  • yellow mustard
  • cayenne pepper
  • chopped sweet pickles
  • finely chopped celery
  • finely chopped onion

For flavorful ribs from the slow cooker, we cut the St. Louis-style ribs in half crosswise, coated each half liberally in a spice rub (a mix of paprika, brown sugar, salt, pepper, onion powder, and granulated garlic), arranged them on end (exposed rib side down) around the rim of the cooking insert, and let them slowly cook until tender. To get that signature shiny, sticky finish, we made an easy barbecue sauce that we brushed onto to the ribs before broiling them.

You might need to buy:
  • RIBS:
  • paprika
  • packed brown sugar
  • kosher salt
  • pepper
  • onion powder
  • granulated garlic
  • BARBECUE SAUCE:
  • ketchup
  • apple juice
  • molasses
  • cider vinegar
  • Worcestershire sauce
  • yellow mustard
  • pepper
  • liquid smoke

Sazón is a spice blend common in Latin American cooking. We developed this recipe with Goya Sazón with Coriander and Annatto (or con Culantro y Achiote). It can be found in the international aisle of most supermarkets; however, other brands will work. (One tablespoon of Goya Sazón equals about two packets.) If you can’t find sazón, use our homemade version. You can substitute 3/4 cup of chopped green bell pepper for the Cubanelle pepper. Allow the rice to rest for the full 15 minutes before lifting the lid to check it. Long-grain rice may be substituted for medium-grain, but the rice will be slightly less creamy.

You might need to buy:
  • ground cumin
  • mayonnaise
  • Salt and pepper
  • vegetable oil
  • Goya Sazón with Coriander and Annatto
  • chicken broth
  • bay leaves